New Stealth Units and Airborne units.

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    • New Stealth Units and Airborne units.

      I was thinking that three new units would be nice... so I came up with these three ideas:

      Paratroopers-Would have range of 50km, their own upgrades, up to level 6, and when dropped they would be invisible to whoever you dropped them on for atleast 1 hour, but if there are counter espionage, no invisibility. Elite commando paratroops would be an option for double the cost. Can be shot down as plane.

      Gliders-When made would have a drop down box asking what type of unit it would be, ex. armoured car, infantry, commandoes, motorized infintry, milita, and antitank. Would have the same stealth abilities as paratroops. Range of 50 km. Would also have their own upgrades. Can be shot downas plane.

      Infiltrators-Would have complete stealth all of the time, except if there is counter espionage which would have 50% chance of detection, and would deal small amounts of damage to all buildings in province making them broken and not making units. Would have low hitpoints, so one unit could kill them in one attack. Could have airborne option as well with range of 100km. Can be shot down. Very fast speed On ground and can "hitchhike" onto enemy units, lowering morale and causing small damage.

      Thanks, these are my suggestions. :)
    • TesloTorpedo wrote:

      this is the first time I have been on these forums so sorry.
      No worries. We were all new here once.

      There are two active threads regarding the proposed addition of a new paratroops/airborne infantry regiment to the game. Both are pretty well developed, and may be worth your reading them. There are also literally dozens of older threads where literally dozens of players have requested the addition of paratroops, in one form or another, to the game.
    • TesloTorpedo wrote:

      Gliders-When made would have a drop down box asking what type of unit it would be, ex. armoured car, infantry, commandoes, motorized infintry, milita, and antitank.
      Teslo, can you provide an example where any major combatant nation air-dropped an entire regiment or brigade-size unit composed of armored cars, motorized infantry, or militia by gliders? I know that the Americans dropped a sizeable contingent of anti-tank guns by glider in support of the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions during the D-Day invasion, but I don't know if those anti-tank formations were the size of independent regiments. I know the Brits and Americans both experimented with glider drops of specially designed light tanks, on a relatively small scale, but incurred very high equipment casualty rates in landing those units via glider. Heavy equipment drops via glider were, by all accounts, extremely hazardous to the gliders, the pilots and the equipment. I don't believe the Allies ever attempted combat air drops of the heavy trucks typically used by motorized infantry. I also don't believe there were any American or British drops of militia; airborne infantry (including the glider infantry regiments) were highly-trained elite units, and it is inconceivable to me that anyone would have used militia for any kind of air drops, and least of all on a regimental or larger scale.
    • Market Garden used glider drops on I believe Arnum bridge, but as I remember it was just some heavier support equipment and personnel to support he regular paratroopers. Its's been 35 years or more since I read the book.
      "A good plan, violently executed now, is better than a perfect plan next week." - General George S. Patton, Jr.

      "Do, or do not. There is no try" - Yoda
    • Peter Mat wrote:

      Market Garden used glider drops on I believe Arnum bridge, but as I remember it was just some heavier support equipment and personnel to support he regular paratroopers.
      The 82nd and 101st had both parachute infantry and glider infantry regiments attached to the divisions during Overlord and Market Garden, and I believe that was typical of the British and other American airborne divisions. Interestingly, the 82nd and 101st division artillery included both parachute and glider drops; I have no idea how they loaded a 75 mm field piece onto a C-47 on the ground, let alone how they got them out the door while they were in flight.

      For our purposes, and given the level of detail and granularity at which COW operates, I think any differences between parachute infantry and glider infantry is a distinction without any real meaning.
    • MontanaBB wrote:

      Interestingly, the 82nd and 101st division artillery included both parachute and glider drops; I have no idea how they loaded a 75 mm field piece onto a C-47 on the ground, let alone how they got them out the door while they were in flight.
      These were also specialized versions of standard equipment; they could be disassembled, dropped under seperate parachutes, and re-assembled after landing. The pieces were small enough to be towed by jeeps (as opposed to trucks or halftracks), which were always landed in gliders. The parachute drop should have provided arty support immediatly in the landing zone.

      It largely failed because the various drops of the same piece could be shattered for miles during the drop.
      When the enemy is driven back, we have failed. When he is cut off, encircled and dispersed, we have succeeded. - Aleksandr Suvorov.
    • K.Rokossovski wrote:

      These were also specialized versions of standard equipment; they could be disassembled, dropped under seperate parachutes, and re-assembled after landing.
      Makes sense, up to the point where you only have three out of four pieces of the 75 mm field gun, which were dropped separately by parachutes.

      As I recall, the assistant division commander of the 101st was killed in one of those over-loaded equipment gliders on landing, when it could not stop on the ground properly.
    • an interesting, though rather long, read on he subject:
      dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a428996.pdf

      To my surprise, Parachute Field Artilley was present in all American parachute drops from 1943 to 1945 except Salerno. Results were mixed, with a deep point of one single operational gun for 82nd airborne at the Normandy invasion, but even then the infantry commanders said in a debriefing:

      All commanders were highly enthusiastic in their praise of the artillery support
      received. They also, without exception, would like to see more work done with a
      view to developing and perfecting the use of parachute field artillery. Even with
      the present small percentage of recovery of weapons, they feel that the support
      available to them from the weapons recovered more than justifies the loss
      incurred in the drop.


      Some other exerts:

      Transport method used:

      The howitzer was broken down into nine loads, M1 to M9, and “were packed in
      standard Air Corps aerial delivery units--cylindrical, padded canvas containers.”
      Two of the containers were modified to fit the front and rear trails. Appendix A contains the
      packing list used by parachute artillerymen to rig and drop the 75-millimeter Pack
      Howitzer and its associated equipment.


      Although vehicles could be dropped by parachute, they were subsequently discarded as
      nonessential due to bulk and weight factors that would change aircraft load plans and
      limit the number of artillerymen able to jump given the limited number of drop aircraft
      available. Leaving these large vehicles off the T/BA caused such things as heavy wire
      laying equipment, large radios, some heavy fire control, and topographic equipment to be
      deleted from the T/BA as well. As a fix, smaller and lighter items of equipment that
      belonged to other branches of service proved to be superb substitutes for the often heavy
      and bulky artillery equipment. Consequently, those items were added to the unit’s basic
      allowance. These changes did not, in any way, hamper or prevent the field artillery from
      performing its mission of providing accurate, responsive fires. All of the howitzer’s
      primary fire control equipment, such as sights and aiming circles, etcetera were not
      modified.

      These revisions required officers and key leaders
      to jump with small map boards and binoculars and dictated the following actions for the
      gun crews upon reaching the DZ: door bundles were pushed out, followed immediately
      by the first jumper. As the troopers were exiting the aircraft, the bundles slung under the
      belly of the aircraft were being released. Each member of the howitzer section was
      assigned a responsibility to bring a specific piece of equipment to the assembly point. To
      assist each soldier, “various colored ‘chutes were used so that the cannoneers could
      identify the loads they were to retrieve-they could spot these while they were still in the
      air and maneuver their own ‘chutes toward them.”11

      Organizational:

      In order for the parachute field artillery battalion to get to its intended DZ, the
      battalion required a total of fifty-two C-47 aircraft. Four planes were required for the
      headquarters battery, and twelve aircraft each for the three firing batteries, the antiaircraft
      battery, and the antitank battery. For planning purposes, the battalion only used forty
      aircraft since the AA and AT battery was used to protect the entire force as opposed to
      just the battalion. Their aircraft numbers were not figured in the battalion allocation.
      When the headquarters battery loaded the aircraft, the primary staff and subordinates
      cross-loaded, or disbursed themselves, across all four of their aircraft. This was so in the
      event one of the planes went down, whether it was due to maintenance problems or shot
      out of the sky, the battery and staff would still be able to perform their mission and
      function with the majority of their personnel. Loading firing battery personnel and
      equipme nt was much the same. “In general, a howitzer section is loaded in a flight of
      three airplanes with the remainder of the battery distributed throughout the twelve planes
      of the battery.”34 This allowed each howitzer section the ability to operate independently
      once it landed and also allowed the battery to continue to perform as a unit should one of
      the aircraft go down.


      Ammo:

      Because of weight factors, only twenty-five to thirty rounds of ammunition could be
      carried on any one plane that had a howitzer loaded on it. The battery leadership felt that
      was a sufficient amount during the initial stages of the drop as other aircraft would bring
      in the balance of the ammunition. As Lieutenant Cox noted, “We decided that a howitzer
      with a dozen rounds is worth considerably more than half a howitzer with a thousand
      rounds”

      Status since WW2:

      From the time of the Korean War through present day, the division saw sporadic
      combat operations involving parachute drops that included the Dominican Republic,
      Grenada, Panama, and the wars in the Gulf region. Parachute field artillery was never
      used in any of those operations. That did not mean parachute artillery was not relevant.
      Most likely it was the nature of the operation that dictated what kinds of forces were
      used. Political factors that might have limited the types and caliber of weapons systems
      used for the operation, limited airframes, purpose of mission, and enemy threats the U.S.
      forces faced are but a few examples of why artillery was not used.
      Despite the nonuse of parachute artillery, all one has to do is look at history from
      World War II to present day to see that that arm is still present in the division’s current
      organization. This is a very strong statement that says field artillery is a relevant part of
      the airborne division.

      Howitzers are still dropped from aircraft and perform the exact same mission they
      did over 60 years ago. Artillery battalions drop as a single organization or with its
      supported maneuver brigade during training exercises and Emergency Deployment
      Readiness Exercises. Relatively speaking, the changes made to conducting airborne
      operations for parachute artillery were minimal. Guns and ammunition are dropped out of
      the back of Air Force aircraft on a platform and instead of having colored parachutes,
      they have colored markings on the load itself. During nighttime operations, the howitzer
      is marked with beanbag lights. Simply put, this is a little light whose foundation is a
      beanbag. The gun crews are cross-loaded over many aircraft (as was done back on D-
      84
      Day) in order to assure mission completion and time standards are in place as they were
      before. Gun crews go through the same actions of landing, moving to the gun, derigging
      it, gaining firing capability and firing missions right from the DZ. The importance of
      airborne artillery in support of airborne infantry is more critical today than it was back
      then. Infantry commanders count on artillery tubes dropping and being able to support his
      maneuver forces within thirty minutes of jumping. They expect and demand that.
      When the enemy is driven back, we have failed. When he is cut off, encircled and dispersed, we have succeeded. - Aleksandr Suvorov.