Pinned Detailed Combat Mechanics (2021)

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    • Detailed Combat Mechanics (2021)

      Detailed Combat Mechanics

      Ever wondered why an infantry defends off a light tank, or why you sometimes win and sometimes lose the same unit matchup?
      After reading this carefully, you should be able to look into the unit stats before you go into battle, and approximately predict its outcome, and also tell what role each unit has.


      Damage value calculation

      Every unit in CoW has its armour class and its damage values against other classes. To determine the damage value of an army against an armour class, the damage values of all the units against that armour class are added together (so if we have two units with 2 damage vs. tanks and 1 unit with 4, it will be 8 against tanks for the army). However, if the army is greater than 10, only the top 10 units with the highest damage against that armour class will be used. The damage efficiency for those 10 units will not be decreased.

      Units always have two damage values: offensive (for attacking) and defensive (for defending).
      (The ratio of the offensive/defensive damage values is the same for a unit against all armour classes.)

      A strength bonus increases the army's damage values by a certain percentage.

      If a unit is damaged, its damage values will be decreased. (20+x.0,8)% is the damage efficiency of the unit, where x represents the health percentage of the unit. In other words, the damage efficiency is 100% for a full health unit and will go down as the unit is damaged, ending at 20% when the unit has zero hp (is very close to zero).

      The fight

      There are three groups we can divide units into: close combat units,ranged units and planes.

      Close combat

      If army A moves into army B while B isn’t moving, army A will attack and B will defend; that will happen again every 30 minutes. If then the owner of army B orders it to move or attack it will attack A and A will defend. That will repeat every 30 minutes (once B is ordered to move or attack you cannot stop it from attacking over and over again till A is destroyed, so if you want to only defend, don’t move the army during the fight).
      The close combat range is 5km (1/10 the range of Artillery); if army A is 5km or closer to B, and either of the armies changes orders (is moving and then is ordered to move elsewhere, or is stationary and ordered to move), that army will start attacking. However, if army A was ordered to attack B before getting too close, it won’t attack from 5km, it will first reach B’s position and then attack.
      Any unit that has no circle around it when selected is a close combat unit; close combat units can engage any enemy unit within 5km of them, so a submarine can engage an infantry if they are within 5km of each other, too.

      There’s an exception – land or naval units can not attack planes in the air. Not even anti air can. However, any land or naval unit has defensive damage against planes. That will be used against planes that attack it or anything within 5km of its position. Anti air has exceptionally high defensive damage against planes, which is its purpose (dealing large damage to planes when they attack the army the anti air is in).

      Ranged units

      If the unit has a circle around it and is not a plane, it’s a ranged unit and the circle is its range. Ranged units are similar to close combat, but they can attack from more than 5km (can attack anything within the circle around them), in which case the target won’t defend (the target can attack back if it’s also ranged and has enough range, though). Just like close combat units, ranged units can only attack in 30-minute intervals, but they can be moving during the reloading (so you can hit-and-run with them if you have the time). If a ranged unit attacks a target closer than 5km, it will become a normal close combat fight (the target will defend). When in close combat, ranged units can only fire at the units they are engaging.

      Planes

      Unlike land units, planes have two attack commands – attack and patrol.

      Attack

      If you order planes to attack another unit, the time it takes for the planes to fly to the target’s current position is measured and becomes the attack timer. The planes will follow the target and deal damage when the timer runs out; then they have to go back to the airport to refuel (you cannot order the planes to do anything while they are returning and then refuelling). This means you can attack a target even if it’s running away and is faster than you (you just fly the distance you were from it when the plane was ordered to attack, then you deal damage, even if the target is far away already). However, if the target flies out of the range of the planes (the circle around them) and the attack timer runs out, the planes won’t deal any damage to the target (though they will still have to refuel).

      Planes receive defensive damage from their ground target before they deal their own. Therefore, if a plane dies to the defensive damage of its target, it won't deal any damage. This also applies to flying bombs and nuclear bombers.

      Patrol

      The second way to fight is patrol. The blue circle ( “patrol circle”) indicates what area the plane will affect; when patrolling the plane’s position is the centre of the patrol circle. When the plane arrives at its position (the centre of the assigned patrol circle), it starts patrolling. A 15-minute interval is set; every time it runs out, the planes deal 1/2 normal damage to all enemy armies within the patrol circle, and to all enemy patrols whose circle overlaps; if there are multiple targets the damage is spread out.
      The targets will also deal ½ defensive damage back; the exception are enemy planes whose patrol circle overlaps, but their current position (the centre of their patrol circle) is not within your patrol circle. I also found out (with patrolling planes vs. land units) that the planes that deal more damage to the target will receive a larger portion of the defensive damage from it. Notice that patrol only attacks enemy units; if you’re at peace, it won’t deal damage and trigger war. Unlike attacking, patrolling planes can patrol forever without refuelling.

      Once a plane starts patrolling, any units within the patrol circle will be saved as intelligence reveals. Even if they disappear afterwards, the game will keep displaying the intelligence reveals till next daychange, or until a plane patrols the area again. The patrol timer does not have to run out, so intelligence reveals can be made without the planes getting damaged.

      :!: Tip: Normally when seeing a neutral or enemy unit travelling you only see a fraction of its path. However, when the foreign unit becomes an intelligence reveal, it will show its whole path, which can sometimes be very helpful. (if they fix this bug, let me know )

      If planes are attacked by other planes in the air (can be direct attack or patrol), they will use their offensive, not defensive damage values to defend. The defensive values are used when the plane is attacked while being grounded on an airport and not refuelling. Refuelling planes and planes on the truck convoy are treated as light armour units with 10 hp and very little defensive damage (0,3-0,5 against all armour classes). That is one of the reasons patrol is used by pro players more frequently than attack. Planes refuel for 30 min on an lv1 airstrip/factory; upgrading it reduces the refuelling time.

      Convoys(additional info)

      Planes turn into truck convoys when they need to move and cannot transfer airports to reach the destination; land units turn into a transport ship when they need to move across water.
      The land unit needs to stay 3-4 hours at the shore to turn into a transport ship (embarking), same for the transport ship to turn back into the transported unit (disembarking). This embarking time is reduced if there is a local port or naval base at the path the unit is using to embark/disembark.
      Convoys (transport ships or trucks) are completely independent on the unit they are transporting. The only difference between an artillery on a transport ship and a heavy tank on a transport ship is what each of the ships turns into after it disembarks. Convoys have their own parameters (damage values, health and speed) and are close combat units. Higher levels of transport ships can be researched, but only the ships you embark on after the research is complete are affected.
      "In CoW, don't stamp on things before looking. Rakes are everywhere!"

      "Don't underestimate noobs; if they don't know what they're doing, how can you?"

      Hornetkeeper
    • Dealing damage

      When you fight an enemy army, each of the units in the enemy army receives your damage output against its armour class divided by the number of units in the enemy army.

      Let's say your army has 12 damage vs. tanks and 6 vs. infantry and is fighting 1 tank and 1 infantry.
      First, the damage value of your army against tanks is calculated (see Damage value calculation). We already know that’s 12. Every time you attack, you’re using 80%-120% of your damage value (the number between 80 and 120 is picked randomly). The result is the damage output (against tanks in this case). Let’s say the random factor is 100%, so the damage output against tanks is 12.
      This damage output is divided by the number of units in the enemy army and then applied to all units in the enemy army with tank armour class. In this case, there are 2 units in the enemy army, so the enemy tank receives 12:2=6 damage and the infantry 6:2=3 damage.

      If there is 1 tank and 2 infantry in the enemy army, it’s calculated the same way again: The tank receives 12:3=4 damage and each of the infantry units receives 6:3=2 damage.
      We’re using tanks as an example, it's calculated the same way for any armour class.

      If you have 2 tanks fighting 1 tank, the 2 tanks won’t win with 50% damage left – they win with sometimes more than 75%. Two tanks have twice the health and damage, so they can do 2x more hits of which each deals 2x more damage. That means they are almost 4x stronger.

      Almost, because the larger army will often have larger problems with overkill.

      The 1 tank has less health, so its health percentage goes down faster. Therefore, the stronger army’s damage goes down slower, giving it even more advantage.
      This way, even in a fight of 100 tanks (army A) against 10 (army B), army A won’t end up with 90% health left. Sure, the damage of both is equal at the start, but as B has 1/10 the health, A's damage efficiency goes down 10x slower over time. Testing this with 8 health and 1 damage tanks and no random factor, army A wins with 94% health left.

      However, the superior army loses health, making its damage lower. Even with no overkill the army of 2 tanks cannot defeat 4 tanks one after one. 4x stronger, in this case, means the army wins with 75% hp left.

      Dealing damage to buildings
      When your units attack or defend against a unit in the centre of an enemy province, or attack the province's centre, the enemy province will also be affected.
      Whenever that happens, some of the province’s buildings are chosen to receive damage (Fortifications/Bunkers are 50% more likely to be chosen). If there are any buildings in the province at least 1 will be always chosen. Then, your army’s damage value against structures is randomized (so the damage output is 80%-120% of the damage value as normally) and the output is evenly distributed between the buildings. A building won’t get damaged if the damage it receives is smaller than 1. Morale also doesn't get damaged if it receives under 1 damage.

      That's all for this guide. Suggestions are highly welcome:)

      Too long for 10 000 characters lol.
      "In CoW, don't stamp on things before looking. Rakes are everywhere!"

      "Don't underestimate noobs; if they don't know what they're doing, how can you?"

      Hornetkeeper
    • There must be a bug, couse i saw land units that had no AA in the stack but had AA atack stats and dealt the AA atack damage to my planes. The enemy unit i atacked was full of artilery units and no AA, the individual units did not have atack against planes in their individual unit sheets, but in the army sheet, when you press the ¨ i ¨ , they showed to have AA atack damage, wich was higher than their defence, and remember, they had no AA units in the mix. As i sayed, i atacked with my airforce and recieved something around the number of the AA atack stats, and their atack stats was proportional with the ratio talked about in the first post, the ratio betwen atack and defence.
      That seemed even wierder when i read the game manual that also states that ground units only deal their defence damage against planes.
    • Yes, all the attack and defence values exist, just some aren't listed in the stats. For land units, they use the attack damage when attacking planes grounded on an airport and not refuelling. If your planes were attacking, they must have received defensive damage. The RNG of 80%-120% may make it look like it was the offensive damage. If your planes got damaged despite not attacking or patrolling over the enemy army, can consider reporting the bug. as I said, when your planes are grounded on the airport the land units can attack them. if the planes are currently in the air, they can only be attacked by other planes and receive defensive damage from the land and naval targets.
      It's the same about AA. You cannot just make an AA wall to prevent enemy planes from flying over it, only if the planes are ordered to attack or patrol over the AA they will receive defensive damage from it. AA only uses its offensive values against planes to attack grounded and not refuelling planes, like other units. (Refuelling planes are light armour convoys).

      As I said, the offensive damage divided by the defensive is the same against all armour classes for any unit. as Artillery has about 4x more attack than defence against other units it also has 4x more attack than defense against planes.
      If you're sure it was the offensive damage, report it to get a better explanation:D It may've been splash damage, too (planes receive defensive damage from all units close to their target).
      "In CoW, don't stamp on things before looking. Rakes are everywhere!"

      "Don't underestimate noobs; if they don't know what they're doing, how can you?"

      Hornetkeeper
    • There were no other units, there was a single stack and since the damage is 4 times higher, it couldnt have been the random 80% - 120%, wich i know about. I mean, the unit had like nearly 30 damage atacking and just about 6 defending and i toke 20 something, all the bonuses and luck will not make 6 damage into 20+ .
      The thing is i didnt take screenshots of the thing happening plus i prefered to ask on the forum first, maybe there is a mechanism i dont know about or it happend to someone else and they have reported it too and have an answer.
      Plus the splash dmg has to have the units very close to oneanother, like 5 unit measurments around the targeted unit, there were no ther units that close. So my question still remains.
    • i_see_mancos wrote:

      So my question still remains.
      I've also once thought of artillery using offensive damage to defend against planes, but the defensive damage value would then be useless (probably still a thing but wouldn't be listed in research stats where only the important values are displayed). I suggest you submit a bug report. Click the gear in the bottom right corner for PC and then the Bug report, or the envelope if you can't find the bug. On mobile click the bell (or whatever button above the globe) and then Bug report, or tap on More at the lower right and then Support (both ways lead to the same ticket).
      Try to write it as a question, so you don't get the "standard answer":)
      "In CoW, don't stamp on things before looking. Rakes are everywhere!"

      "Don't underestimate noobs; if they don't know what they're doing, how can you?"

      Hornetkeeper
    • Nice guide!

      Hornetkeeper wrote:

      If planes are attacked by other planes in the air (can be direct attack or patrol), they will use their offensive, not defensive damage values to defend. The defensive values are used when the plane is attacked while being grounded on an airport and not refuelling. Refuelling planes and planes on the truck convoy are treated as light armour units with 10 hp and very little defensive damage (0,3-0,5 against all armour classes). That is one of the reasons patrol is used by pro players more frequently than attack. Planes refuel for 30 min on an lv1 airstrip/factory; upgrading it reduces the refuelling time.
      Correction on this:
      If a plane is attacked by another plane (be it patrol or direct attack) it will use its defensive damage to defend back, not its offensive damage. But the defending planes will strike first, thus lowering the attacking planes efficiency before the offensive damage values are applied.

      Hornetkeeper wrote:

      If there is 1 tank and 2 infantry in the enemy army, it’s calculated the same way again: The tank receives 12:3=4 damage and each of the infantry units receives 6:3=2 damage.
      We’re using tanks as an example, it's calculated the same way for any armour class.
      Correction on this: You don't divide by the number of units in the army, but multiply by the percentage share of units of that armor class.
      So in your example the tank would receive 33% of the attack damage vs. armored (12 * 0.33 = 4), while the Infantry would receive 66% of the attack damage vs. unarmored (6 * 0.66 = 4).

      The game calculates that percentage share for you, just open the army info panel of the enemy army and look it up in the "damage distribution" column. Multiply those values with your own army's "damage potential" values against these armor classes.

      Hornetkeeper wrote:

      Yes, all the attack and defence values exist, just some aren't listed in the stats.
      Just want to back you up here that this is correct. We just don't show the damage values in the unit stats against some armor classes as they are rarely used, but they can be used. The true damage values are always shown in the army info popup in the "damage potential" column. You can trust these values.

      This means that an artillery which is attacked by aircraft will defend using its defensive damage values against aircraft. If the artillery bombards planes which are idling in an intact airport, the artillery will use its offensive damage values vs. aircraft (which is higher than its defense damage values).
    • Detailed explanation

      I didn't fully understand the calculation used in this part: "If a unit is damaged, its damage values will be decreased. (20+x.0,8)% is the damage efficiency of the unit, where x represents the health percentage of the unit. In other words, the damage efficiency is 100% for a full health unit and will go down as the unit is damaged, ending at 20% when the unit has zero hp (is very close to zero)."

    • Very good guide, thanks a lot.

      You clarify the damage calculation of the big stacks and the question about the "10 most effective units" taken in account. Thanks to you and freezy who confirmed it in another thread I see clear in this mechanism now.

      Also thanks for mentioning that convoys and refueling planes inflict damages. I knew it since I sent a couple tac bombers attack a convoy of 15 planes after I destroyed the airfield and realised they wouldn't make it. Unlike the naval convoys that clearly show the damage they deal to naval units the air convoys don't. I wish the game was a bit more clear about it.
      Do the numbers you mention (0.3 to 0.5 damages) are correct for calculation ? I'll check this out on my side when I'll have the opportunity.

      There is one point I want to correct you on (and maybe open a debate):

      Hornetkeeper wrote:

      When in close combat, ranged units can only fire at the units they are engaging.
      I thought exactly the same till a few days ... and this is wrong. I witnessed it.
      In a Dominion Antarctica map one of the players sent over 60 units including arty and RRG in the central lab.
      A second player sent 3 separate groups to get the lab. Group 1 with tanks, group 2 with tanks and group 3 with arty.
      Player 1 was offline when player 2 sent the 2 groups of tanks in melee, then brought the arty behind once the big stack was engaged.
      No other units, no planes around from player 1 ... then he came online and switched the target of his engaged stack for the ranged arty. The timer showed the ranged arty as new target and I was expecting it to fail, the damages been delt to the close combat ennemies instead but it did not ! After a few rounds the arty of player B was annihilated, the target switch did worked !
      I spoke about it with another player on the forum and he told me this "change" wasn't new, he was already using it in CoW 1.0 games.
      I wish the devs will come back on it and unable the target switch of engaged arty. It would make it more accurate with the reality of a fight btw. An arty unit must deal with close combat opponents before shooting further. Fact.
    • Savitar wrote:

      I didn't fully understand the calculation used in this part:
      Savitar, if your unit is at full health, it will have 100% damage. As your unit gets damaged its "damage efficiency" decreases, when the unit is at 0% health the damage efficiency is 20% (but the unit is usually dead by then...)
      As you start at 20% damage efficiency when you're at 0% hp and end at 100% efficiency when you're 100% hp, the 100% hp percentage has to actually "fit" into 20%-100% damage efficiency.

      So, you first calculate how much % of full health your unit has.

      As your unit still has 20% efficiency at 0% health, it means you have to add 20 to your health percentage to get the efficiency. But that would mean your unit would end up at 120% efficiency at 100% hp.
      To prevent that, you need to multiply your health percentage by 0.8. This way you don't add 100 to 20 when you're at full health, you only add 80 to 20 so the efficiency is 100%, which is correct.

      To try explain it another way:
      See the formula: X * 0.8 + 20
      The result of this calculation is the damage efficiency. X is the health percentage so if I'm at half health it's 50.

      First, my health percentage is multiplied by 0.8 so health has less effect. Then 20 is added to it. So if I'm at 50% health, I multiply it by 0.8 first, so I get 40. Then add 20 to it, I have 60.

      That way, if a unit is at 0% hp, I multiply it by 0.8 to get 0% and add the 20 to it so its efficiency is actually 20%.

      And if a unit is at 100% hp, I multiply that by 0.8 to get 80%, and add 20 to that, so I'm at 100% again, and that's the efficiency.

      I suck at explaining things. I should've included "(nerds only)" in the title... ;)

      Merlin Pin-Pin wrote:

      I thought exactly the same till a few days ... and this is wrong. I witnessed it.
      It's all right, I don't even remember where I got that. Thanks for the correction;)

      freezy wrote:

      Correction on this:
      If a plane is attacked by another plane (be it patrol or direct attack) it will use its defensive damage to defend back, not its offensive damage. But the defending planes will strike first, thus lowering the attacking planes efficiency before the offensive damage values are applied.
      Hm.
      Last time I was trying this (about 1 month ago) I attacked Interceptors with my own interceptors. I think they had 200 offensive and 100 defensive damage and I instantly received about 220 when I attacked them. (I actually tried it out multiple times before, just was checking if it's still a thing). It was against a player, as far as I remember.
      Didn't try out patrol though, that may be different.

      When using direct attack planes use offensive damage to defend, is what I meant in the guide. Maybe it wasn't all that clear and seemed to be including patrol which I'm not that sure about.

      After some reconsideration, are you still sure you want to back your correction up...?

      (myb it's right, been some time since I tested that;) )

      freezy wrote:

      Correction on this: You don't divide by the number of units in the army, but multiply by the percentage share of units of that armor class.
      So in your example the tank would receive 33% of the attack damage vs. armored (12 * 0.33 = 4), while the Infantry would receive 66% of the attack damage vs. unarmored (6 * 0.66 = 4).

      The game calculates that percentage share for you, just open the army info panel of the enemy army and look it up in the "damage distribution" column. Multiply those values with your own army's "damage potential" values against these armor classes.
      Good point.... as you see, we both got the same results. I don't know how the game calculates it but using my "dividing method" will always get you to the exact same outcome as using the standard "multiply by damage distribution" method. Just two forms of the same thing. I am ineffective, I always choose the more complicated method to calculate something.
      Maybe I just don't want to use your method as I'd still have to figure how much damage each unit receives. I will get the damage dealt to that armour class but will still have to divide it by the amount of units of that armour class in the army. Only then can I get the damage dealt to individual units (useful if you have different unit types in the stack).

      Aritemis wrote:

      Very detailed and accurate, except that minors reading that probably don't understand a thing
      What do you think I write guides for? People to understand them? It's for likes! If you don't understand the guide, you can't find flaws on it so you must like it! :D
      "In CoW, don't stamp on things before looking. Rakes are everywhere!"

      "Don't underestimate noobs; if they don't know what they're doing, how can you?"

      Hornetkeeper
    • Hornetkeeper wrote:


      Hm.Last time I was trying this (about 1 month ago) I attacked Interceptors with my own interceptors. I think they had 200 offensive and 100 defensive damage and I instantly received about 220 when I attacked them. (I actually tried it out multiple times before, just was checking if it's still a thing). It was against a player, as far as I remember.
      Didn't try out patrol though, that may be different.

      When using direct attack planes use offensive damage to defend, is what I meant in the guide. Maybe it wasn't all that clear and seemed to be including patrol which I'm not that sure about.

      After some reconsideration, are you still sure you want to back your correction up...?

      (myb it's right, been some time since I tested that;) )



      Good point.... as you see, we both got the same results. I don't know how the game calculates it but using my "dividing method" will always get you to the exact same outcome as using the standard "multiply by damage distribution" method. Just two forms of the same thing. I am ineffective, I always choose the more complicated method to calculate something.Maybe I just don't want to use your method as I'd still have to figure how much damage each unit receives. I will get the damage dealt to that armour class but will still have to divide it by the amount of units of that armour class in the army. Only then can I get the damage dealt to individual units (useful if you have different unit types in the stack).
      to 1): Well I don't rule out that we have a bug here. I will forward this to QA then as I would say it's not intended.

      to 2): Indeed, I misread your first calculation a little bit. So in the end you can use either calculation, what you prefer.
    • I would support Hornetkeeper's claim that offensive damages are delt by defending planes.
      I had many air vs air fights recently and the damges delt by defending planes were unexpectingly high.
      The most revealing example is the following:

      My ennemy had 5 interceptors heading back to base to refuel after an attack.
      I had set my own 5 interceptors in ambush to get them on their way back (so I am sure he did not switch target to my own planes at the last moment as they had to refuel to attack again).
      Both interceptors were same level, Pan Asia (me) vs Allies (him).
      Knowing the interceptors defence is twice weaker than the attack vs air this is the result of the fight :
      I lost 1 interceptor and the remaining was 3/4 of their health condition.
      His 5 interceptors were barely scratched .

      I don't clearly remind other examples even though I had many air fights in the game but my overall feeling is the defending planes were dealing insane damage during those engagments.
    • I am Japanese. I'm interested in this article, so I'll translate Japanese into Google. I like to war between virtual units. It was very troublesome to calculate the damage efficiency one by one. Therefore, I created a table that allows you to check the damage efficiency from the physical strength of the unit at a glance. :D
      I have translated what I use all the time, so please refer to it! :S

      損傷によるダメージ効率変動値確認(演算用)/切り下げ
      ・ Die linke Seite ist die Schadenseffizienz, die den verbleibenden HP% entspricht, und die rechte Seite ist die Schadenseffizienz, die den verbleibenden HP% entspricht
      HP1%Less than 20%
      HP1% 20%(20.8)
      HP2% 21%(21.6)
      HP3% 22%(22.4)
      HP4% 23%(23.2)
      HP5% 24%(24)
      HP6% 24(24.8)
      HP7% 25%(25.6)
      HP8% 26%(26.4)
      HP9% 27%(27.2)
      HP10% 28%(28)
      HP11% 28%(28.8)
      HP12% 29%(29.6)
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      HP14% 31%(31.2)
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      HP68% 74% (74.4)
      HP69% 75%(75.2)
      HP70% 76%(76)
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      HP77% 81%(81.6)
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      HP80% 84%(84)
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      HP93% 94% (94.4)
      HP94% 95%(95.2)
      HP95% 96%(96)
      HP96% 96%(96.8)
      HP97% 97%(97.6)
      HP98% 98%(98.4)
      HP99% 99%(99.2)
      HP100% 100%(100)

      The post was edited 1 time, last by Kama8823: Translation mistake ().