NEW UNIT TYPE- Calvalry

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    • Quasi-duck wrote:

      oceanhawk wrote:

      So you think the mechanics can travel at the 55 km ph that light tanks travel at?
      Trucks and half-tracks, duh.
      That is some pretty shaky ground.... Basing your whole argument on a "maybe" you can't prove.
      In RL maybe, but in CoW not really..



      If Socialists understood Economics, they wouldn't be socialists
      -Friedrich von Haye


    • oceanhawk wrote:

      In RL maybe, but in CoW not really..
      So you're saying the tankers just pull a Heer and ditch their tanks at the side of the road and get a new one, since they have no mechanics?

      Pablo22510 wrote:

      h. But that's precisely my point. If my argument is 'shaky', so is yours. You also have no evidence to prove it.
      You were the one who brought it up....

      Besides, my argument is based on cavalry units actually being used and useful in WWII.
      Forum Gang Commissar



      I changed it for you Dia <3
    • Greetings.

      The cavalry was a totally obsolete unit during the second world war, this was observed in the first bars of the German campaign in Poland. Mainly, the cavalry is not associated with the second world war, would also be a useless unit in the game.


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.
    • Caesar wrote:

      The cavalry was a totally obsolete unit during the second world war, this was observed in the first bars of the German campaign in Poland. Mainly, the cavalry is not associated with the second world war, would also be a useless unit in the game.
      Have you seriously not read anything in this post? A Hungarian division broke a Soviet line that German infantry could not break.
      Forum Gang Commissar



      I changed it for you Dia <3
    • Quasi-duck wrote:

      Have you seriously not read anything in this post? A Hungarian division broke a Soviet line that German infantry could not break.
      Can you tell me how a unit of cavalry could attack a Division of tanks and artillery?


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.
    • Quasi-duck wrote:

      Depends, artillery is simple, sitting duck. Tanks, well, what kind?
      During the second world war, cavalry was massacred, is useless even if you compare it to face horses with tanks.


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.
    • en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charge_at_Krojanty

      For example the 'Charge at Krojanty'.

      'On September 1, 1939, German land, air, and sea units struck targets all across Poland. Although it was not a surprise attack, the speed and level of violence of the assault were unprecedented. Polish defenders had to react quickly as planes, tanks, and infantrymen surged into their country. To Poles, this was Kampania wrzesniowa (the September Campaign), when every branch of the armed forces produced heroes and myth. In the front ranks stood ulanow (uhlans, or lancers), szwolezerow (light horsemen), and strzelcow konnych (mounted riflemen)—all cavalrymen employed to cover retreats, gather intelligence, and when possible capture key terrain to support infantry counterattacks. This put these troopers into many of the initial skirmishes, some successful, more not. Soon, dead horses and their riders littered the fields' Source: HistoryNet.


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.
    • Caesar wrote:

      For example the 'Charge at Krojanty'.

      'On September 1, 1939, German land, air, and sea units struck targets all across Poland. Although it was not a surprise attack, the speed and level of violence of the assault were unprecedented. Polish defenders had to react quickly as planes, tanks, and infantrymen surged into their country. To Poles, this was Kampania wrzesniowa (the September Campaign), when every branch of the armed forces produced heroes and myth. In the front ranks stood ulanow (uhlans, or lancers), szwolezerow (light horsemen), and strzelcow konnych (mounted riflemen)—all cavalrymen employed to cover retreats, gather intelligence, and when possible capture key terrain to support infantry counterattacks. This put these troopers into many of the initial skirmishes, some successful, more not. Soon, dead horses and their riders littered the fields' Source: HistoryNet.
      So bad the Waffen SS had 5 cavalry divisions.

      en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category…ivisions_of_the_Waffen-SS
      Forum Gang Commissar



      I changed it for you Dia <3
    • Quasi-duck wrote:

      So bad the Waffen SS had 5 cavalry divisions.
      And? The cavalry was an obsolete unit.


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.
    • In 1942, what many consider the last cavalry charge in history took place in the Soviet Union. The era of large-scale clashes between mounted fighters, which stretched back to ancient times, had finally come to an end.

      With sabers drawn, about 600 Italian cavalrymen yelled out their traditional battle cry of “Savoia!” and galloped headlong toward 2,000 Soviet foot soldiers armed with machine guns and mortars. On August 23, 1942 (some sources say August 24), the cavalrymen—part of the Axis invasion of the Soviet Union during World War II— were attempting to close a gap that had opened up between the Italian and German armies along the Don River. It was to be the end of an era. Though experts believe that smaller and less well-documented cavalry charges likely occurred later on in World War II and possibly as late as the 1970s in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), they generally describe this as the last major charge in history.








      In January of 1942, the U.S. 26th Cavalry attacked Japanese infantry on the Bataan Peninsula. Later, the same unit even managed to hold off enemy tanks. American mounted units were not used elsewhere during the war, but George Patton supposedly once remarked that had he been given cavalry in the war in North Africa, not a single German would have escaped the Allies.

      In August of 1942, 700 mounted Italian troops overran a Soviet artillery position along the Don River at the town of Izbusenskij. The event has been heralded often as “the last successful cavalry charge in history.” But even that isn’t accurate.

      In the final weeks of the war, cavalry on the Eastern Front successfully attacked a German supply column. Fittingly, the unit involved in this final charge, which took place on March 1, 1945, was none other than the Polish 1st Cavalry.
    • Quasi-duck wrote:

      Caesar wrote:

      The cavalry was an obsolete unit.

      What do you mean with this? A cavalry unit can only be used as a recognition, in the event of an attack of armored, artillery or other unit, is massacred.


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.
    • Caesar wrote:

      What do you mean with this?
      US Special Forces cavalry. SEAL's I think.

      Caesar wrote:

      in the event of an attack of armored, artillery or other unit, is massacred.
      Another user posted already about successful cavalry charges in WWII, read over this thread (I mean this one we are on).

      forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=51386
      Forum Gang Commissar



      I changed it for you Dia <3
    • Quasi-duck wrote:

      Caesar wrote:

      What do you mean with this?
      US Special Forces cavalry. SEAL's I think.

      Caesar wrote:

      in the event of an attack of armored, artillery or other unit, is massacred.
      Another user posted already about successful cavalry charges in WWII, read over this thread (I mean this one we are on).
      forum.axishistory.com/viewtopic.php?t=51386
      Quasi, the cavalry would be useless at the game unit would be massacred by the aviation and other units.


      "I came, I saw, I conquered" Written in a report to Rome 47 B.C., after conquering Pharnaces at Zela in Asia Minor in just five days; as quoted in Life of Caesar by Plutarch; reported to have been inscribed on one of the decorated wagons in the Pontic triumph, in Lives of the Twelve Caesars, Julius, by Suetonius.


      "Alea iacta est" Gaius Julius Caesar.