MontanaBB Lieutenant General

  • Male
  • 47
  • from Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Member since Mar 30th 2016

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  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, November 27, 2017, is a photo of a young Lt. (j.g.) John F. Kennedy in the cockpit of his PT boat, c. 1944.

  • Restrisiko -

    Here should actually be a picture to see ..
    *We are still working on it ..*

    • MontanaBB -

      Unfortunately, I have never figured out how to post photos in member wall comments. No-one seems to know how to do it.

      * sigh *

  • MontanaBB -

    November 27, 2017: First person to identify the young officer in my new avatar photo wins a cookie.

  • injinji -

    I think all the spammers we are finding are one person with many accounts.

    • MontanaBB -

      Or several related groups. There are sports link spammers, the weird Chinese language university spammers,and the exam prep spammers. Maybe I'm wrong, but the groups seem to be fairly distinct.

  • m1tanker632 -

    BB I am in a 100 game we are now down to 2 AI and 10 players. What data are you looking to gather?

    • MontanaBB -

      Hey. Thanks for following up. I responded at greater length at the forum thread on point.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, November 8, 2017: Sergeant Richard Gordon "Tiny" Sowell, today became the latest American soldier to return home from World War II. The youngest of seven children, Tiny was killed by a mortar shell on Saipan on July 7, 1944; he was 21 years old.

    Tiny was remembered as the most popular kid at Palm Beach High School, and was elected president of his class. Too small to play high school football, he was an all-state athlete in baseball and basketball, and served as the school mascot during football games. Half way through his sophomore year at the University of Florida, he dropped out and volunteered for the U.S. Army.

    Tiny's broken body was quickly buried by his fellow soldiers, and when his remains were rediscovered five years later they could not be identified. They were transferred to Hawaii were they were buried under an "unknown soldier" grave stone. In 2015, the remains were disinterred and DNA tested, and were a perfect match when his surviving nephew was tested in 2017 ---- Tiny had a name and a family again.

    He will be flown home to Palm Beach County later today and buried with full military honors on November 10, with his surviving niece and nephew in attendance. Tiny was just another American kid, special only to his family and friends, but today his hometown honors his homecoming, 74 years after he went to war.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, October 26, 2017: Corporal Desmond Doss, U.S. Army medic and recipient of the Medal of Honor. Doss was a conscientious objector who volunteered for service in the U.S. Army, but refused to carry a weapon as a devout Christian. He became a battlefield medic, and was personally responsible for carrying 75 wounded soldiers to safety during the Battle of Okinawa.

    If you haven't seen the 2016 movie about Doss produced and directed by Mel Gibson, I recommend it. It's hard to believe that men such as Doss once walked the earth.

    And, yes, that is President Harry Truman presenting Doss with the Medal of Honor in the photo.

  • LOS LIDERES HD -

    hola

    • MontanaBB -

      Saludos. Como esta usted, senor?

    • LOS LIDERES HD -

      muy bien y tu ?

    • MontanaBB -

      Estoy pasando las horas. Como esta el clima en Buenos Aires esta noche?

    • MontanaBB -

      Perdon mi espanol pidgin, por favor. Han pasado muchos anos desde mis clases de espanol de la escuela secundaria y la universidad.

    • LOS LIDERES HD -

      ah pues ,un poco feo el clima llovio ase poco y ase frio . y si esta de noche , una pregusta por si sabes , he visto que algunas presonas tiene como rangos como el mio como reculta y de mas rango , sabes donde puedo ver los rangos o como tenerlos ?

  • SuggestedSuggest -

    100-player World @ War. 8 active players remaining. 5 Island AIs remaining.
    Food production is negative.

  • Nucking Futz -

    50-player Americas "Homefront" map...im playing one. 3 or 4 players left and almost all AI dead. Food production is positive

    • MontanaBB -

      NF, please see private conversation thread that I started in response. Thanks.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, October 15, 2017: Maj. Richard I. Bong, U.S. Army Air Forces. Dick Bong was the top American fighter ace of World War II with 40 victories, all achieved in the Lockhed P-38 Lightning against Japanese army and navy aircraft. He was awarded the Medal of Honor in December 1944, and sent home, where he married his fiancee Marge, and became a test pilot for Lockheed's first generation jet fighter, the P-80. Bong was killed two days before the atomic bomb was dropped on Hiroshima, when his P-80's fuel pump failed at low altitude and his parachute did not open sufficiently to save his life. He was 24 years old.

  • Madman20 -

    sorry wrong post

  • Madman20 -

    sorry to here about that

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, October 6, 2017: American war correspondent Ernie Pyle. Fondly remembered by U.S. fighting men for his honest, on-the-scene coverage of the war in Europe and the Pacific, Pyle suffered the same hardships as the infantrymen he covered. After two years of nearly continuous combat, Pyle suffered an episode of physical collapse in Europe in late 1944, and returned home to the United States for several months before departing in early 1945 to cover the Pacific War. Pyle was killed by enemy machine gun fire during the Okinawa campaign.

    • Diabolical -

      An example of a courageous reporter who didn't shirk his duty to his country. The modern concept of "objective reporting" is severely overshadowed by the mainstream liberal media's obvious disdain for traditional values and of the people who support those values.

      Most American reporters of today would never be willing to step into such a situation where they would suffer alongside the troops that they might be reporting with. Surely, there are exceptions to this, and I hope that most of those exceptions are found in the "embedded reporters" in our military actions.

    • MontanaBB -

      Yup.

  • darksoul111 -

    Just a quick question : if I attack an enemy stack with a nuclear bomber, but the enemy stack has a lot of AAs and SPAAs. Is it possible that my nuclear bomber will be shot down without dealing much damage?

    • MontanaBB -

      Yes. Nuclear bombers get shot down all the time by AA groundfire. As for damage, nuclear bomber and nuclear rocket strength is pretty close to all or nothing. Damaging a nuclear bomber, but not destroying it, before it successfully attacks really doesn't reduce its attack strength much at all.

    • darksoul111 -

      Well that sucks for me, he has 8 SPAAs in his stack... Guess I'll wait for another opportunity

    • MontanaBB -

      And remember, like a lot of armor class units, SPAA is +50% strength on plains, increasing its AA value by 50% too.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, September 29, 2017: "Willie & Joe," the eponymous dog-faced GIs of Stars & Stripes cartoonist Bill Mauldin. Mauldin's characters were hugely popular with U.S. Army soldiers, but vehemently hated by Gen. George Patton, who saw the unshaven, disheveled dog-faces as the epitome of poor discipline. Patton tried to have the cartoon banned and Mauldin disciplined, and it took an intervention by Supreme Commander Dwight Eisenhower before Patton backed down. Eisenhower said the cartoon was good for GI morale, and that was enough for him.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, September 22, 2017: Lt. Col. John "Mad Jack" Churchill. While leading several different British commando units during World War II, Mad Jack carried a Scottish broad sword into battle, saying that any officer who failed to carry a sword was improperly dressed. Mad Jack is also the last British soldier known to have killed an enemy in battle with an English long bow.

    British eccentricity with a violent twist.

  • _Pontus_ -

    The gas mask for the horse ... You have eagle eyes :))
    You are the first to notice. Methinks the photograph was staged for the home front and a masked horse didn't look cool ;)

    • MontanaBB -

      Humans, horses . . . we're all mammals, and none of us respond well to chlorine or mustard gas. I'm guessing you're right: the photo was staged, because clearly the cavalry was not going to do well in a poison gas warfare environment.

    • MontanaBB -

      The "Animal" is always welcome here!

    • VorlonFCW -

      tried using the same code as putting image in a post, didn't work

    • MontanaBB -

      Thanks, Vorlon. Someone knows the answer. Maybe the question will get the attention of some of our Bytro home office rocket surgeons.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, September 16, 2017: Ira Hayes, one of six U.S. Marines to raise the American flag on Mt. Suribachi during the battle of Iwo Jima, he was immortalized in Joe Rosenthal's iconic black-and-white photograph of the flag-raising. Hayes was one of only two of the men in the photograph to survive the battle, and was hailed as a "hero" when he was sent home on a war bond tour. Hayes, a Pima Indian, and a shy man by nature, hated the attention, and always disclaimed any status as a "hero," saying that the real heroes were his fellow Marines who didn't come home. After the war, Hayes suffered from PTSD and his life was cut short by alcoholism, but he was later memorialized in "The Ballad of Ira Hayes," a country music tune sung by Johnny Cash.

    Hayes was buried in Arlington National Cemetery, only a few hundred yards from the U.S.Marine Corps War Memorial that was inspired by Joe Rosenthal's photograph of the Iwo Jima flag-raising.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, September 11, 2017: Chesty Puller, the U.S. Marine Corps' ideal. After keeping the George Marshall avatar twice as long as I normally do, I felt the need to bring back another one of my favorites, Chesty. See below for a description of Chesty's history and significance to the Corps.

  • Diabolical -

    What the heck happened? You were just here replying to one of my posts.

    Wow! It looks like Trump's cleaning house, here.

    I feel your pain....we'll see you back in two weeks.

    (...even a Major General can get banned...)

    • MontanaBB -

      No, not really. I'm apparently in some kind of feedback loop whereby the system keeps reimposing a ban that was a mistake in the first place, re-setting a 30-day ban through September 20 -- one that was removed by forum administrators over a week ago. It's really kind of aggravating, and no-one among the staff can figure it out. I just keep emailing WiseOdin, and he keeps removing them.

    • Diabolical -

      Well, the automatic banning system caused me a bunch of grief last fall. It needs a serious revamp or else dropped from the server.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, August 25, 2017: General George C. Marshall. Marshall was undoubtedly the most important American military leader of the Second World War. As U.S. Army chief of staff from 1939 to 1945, he was responsible for guiding the expansion, training and equipping of the U.S. Army that fought and won the war in Europe and the Pacific. He was personally responsible for selecting for promotion almost every American general officer who served in the war, including Eisenhower, Bradley and Patton.

    Offered the operational command of the Normandy invasion by President Roosevelt, Marshall wanted to accept but told the president to do what he thought was right for the country. After thinking it over, Roosevelt told Marshall that he wouldn't be able to sleep without Marshall in Washington. Thus the American general who made the greatest contribution to Allied victory in the war never saw combat in it.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, August 18, 2017: Ilyushin IL-2 Sturmovik. Like the RAF's Spitfire, the Sturmovik became one of the iconic aircraft of the war, capturing the imagination of the Soviet people in much the same the way the Spitfire did in Britain.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, August 11, 2017: North American P-51D Mustang. One of the three or four greatest piston-engine fighters produced during World War II, and the only one with the range to escort Allied heavy bombers all the way to Berlin and Tokyo.

  • Pstomar -

    Hi

    • MontanaBB -

      Hiya back, Pstomar. Welcome to the Call of War Forum. Please ping me if I can be of help. Cheers.

    • Pstomar -

      I wanna have allies. People who can speak English and are experienced. United States is great. your in game name?

    • MontanaBB -

      Same as my forum handle, but I am on a bit of a COW sabbatical right now ---- new job is still soaking up most of my free time. I have one active game, and it's a "friendly" set up among a bunch of Player's League types to accumulate the elite level blueprints.

    • Pstomar -

      k

    • Pstomar -

      Elite level blueprints arent very necessary lest you are in very very late game.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, August 4, 2017: Lt. Cdr. Edward "Butch" O'Hare, the U.S. Navy's first fighter ace, and the Navy's first recipient of the Medal of Honor during World War II. On February 20, 1942, O'Hare was credited with single-handedly shooting down five Japanese bombers that were on an attack run against his aircraft carrier, the USS Lexington, 450 miles east of Rabaul.

    O'Hare was later lost in action while leading one of the first-ever night-time fighter interdiction missions from the USS Enterprise in November 1943. He was 29 years old.

    In 1949, Chicago renamed its primary commercial airfield "O'Hare International Airport" as a tribute to the young Navy hero.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, July 29, 2017: Brig. Gen. Theodore Roosevelt, III, commonly known as "Teddy Roosevelt, Jr."

    Ted was the assistant division commander of the U.S. 4th Infantry Division, and requested that he be permitted to accompany the first assault wave of 4th ID troops on Utah Beach during the D-Day landings on June 6, 1944. His request was twice rejected by the division commander, and only approved after Ted put his request in writing, stating that a general on the beach could assess, organize and improvise on the spot. In the event, the landing force was dropped several hundred yards from their intended landing zone, and Ted (who walked with a cane) re-organized the beach assault on the fly and under fire, running from squad to squad, platoon to platoon, meting out orders to sergeants, lieutenants and captains, with a Colt M1911 .45 in one hand and pointing with his cane with the other.

    When he was later asked what was "the single greatest act of courage” he witnessed during the war, Gen. Omar Bradley responded "Ted Roosevelt on Utah Beach."

    Ted died of a heart attack on July 12, 1944, while his promotion to major general and appointment as the new commander of the 90th Infantry Division were pending. For his actions on June 6, 1944, he was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor.

  • VorlonFCW -

    Your post is still there, In fact I don't think any were deleted. Did the heat get to you this afternoon? lol

    • MontanaBB -

      The missing post quoted the same excerpt from you about "sane" proposals, but also said the following:

      "I want my genetically-engineered Nazi super dragons."

      It was intended to be funny and to mock many of the more ridiculously unrealistic and anachronistic proposals for change we see all the time. I typed it, it posted, it was listed in my "recent activity," and then it was gone 60 minutes later when I returned.

      If the "heat" is getting to me, then I am completely delusional on multiple counts. It posted to the thread, and then it was gone.

    • VorlonFCW -

      interesting. That would have been funny.I am guessing that Genetically-engineered super dragons would have been fine, but the reference to them being Nazi set off big flashing lights in Hamburg. German laws and all that.

  • MontanaBB -

    New avatar, July 22, 2017: the actual battle ensign of the USS Samuel B. Roberts, flown as the U.S. Navy destroyer escort steamed into battle against the Japanese battle group led by the 72,000-ton super battleship Yamato. As the Roberts was sinking, one of her surviving crew members removed the ensign, and then held it for three days until he was pulled from the ocean by his rescuers. The ensign was quite literally soaked in the oil of its ship, the blood of its crew, and the salt water of the Philippine Sea.

    Apart from the bones of John Paul Jones, that's about as close as the U.S. Navy comes to a holy relic.